Conversions

  • T = tablespoon; tsp = teaspoon; C = cup
  • 1 cup = 16 T = 1/2 pint =  ¼ qt = 8 fluid oz = 48 tsp
  • 1 pint = 32 T = 2 C = ½ qt = 16 fluid oz
  • 1 quart = 64 T = 4 C = 2 pints = 32 fluid oz = 1.06 liter
  • 1 gallon = 16 C = 8 pints = 4 qt = 128 fluid oz
  • 1 T = 3 tsp = ½ fluid oz = 1/16 C
  • 1/3 C = 5 T plus 1 tsp = 16 tsp
  • 1 jigger = 3 T
  • 1/8 cup = 2 T = 1 oz
  • 1/6 cup = 2 T + 2 teaspoons
  • 1/4 cup = 4 T = 2 oz
  • 1/3 cup = 5 T + 1 tsp
  • 3/8 cup = 6 T
  • 1/2 cup = 8 T
  • 2/3 cup = 10 T+ 2 tsp
  • 3/4 cup = 12 T
  • 1 tsp = 60 drops
  • Dash = less than 1/8 tsp, less than a pinch
  • Pinch = less than 1/8 tsp, more than a dash
  • Shot glass = generally 1.25 oz

ingredients

Some common recipe equivalents:

  • 1 stick of butter = 4 oz = 8 tablespoons = ¼ pound = ½ C
  • 1 medium lemon or lime = about 1-3 T juice = 1 ½ tsp zest
  • 1 med orange = about ½ C juice = 2 T zest
  • 1 C rice + 2 C water = 3 C cooked rice
  • 1 med onion = about 1 C chopped
  • 4 C cocoa = 1 lb
  • 1 lb sugar = 1 ¼ C
  • 750 ml = one bottle of wine
  • 1 T fresh herbs = 1 tsp dried
  • 3 med garlic cloves, minced = about 1 T

Volume to weight conversions are used in commercial kitchens, since bakers weigh their ingredients; a pound of flour has a different volume than a pound of sugar, for instance. Most home recipes (including the ones on this site) are measured by volume, but if you happen to have a kitchen scale, you can find conversion help here.

And if you have a cookbook from across the pond, a metric conversions calculator might come in handy.

An instant-read thermometer is essential in the kitchen. Use it to avoid overcooking your expensive steaks and roasts (bad) and to avoid undercooking poultry/sending your guests to the hospital (much worse). There’s a handy guide to temps here.

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